Charity / Fashion / Magazine / Vogue

Baroque Obama

I’m going to be honest here, I’m not sure where I’m going with the title of this blog post. I think things will become clearer later when I have weaved some sort of Beyonce type analogy in here, or, perhaps, I’ll just mime this post. Oh look at that, I managed it already! So that’s the second word taken care of.

The first word is much easier. Baroque styling is perfectly suited to winter, it offers a surfeit of layering options with it’s natural decadence. This could explain why it always seems to raise it’s head in winter. February’s Vogue offers a single page dedicated to a Saint Laurent ‘silver spun cocktail blouse’ show cases this genre perfectly.

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(I must apologise now to Keira Knightly who features on the back of February’s Vogue in a Chanel advert. Very glamorous you might be thinking, however after a lamentable incident with a non-sealing plastic tub and a Tesco tuna salad, she ended up with tuna all over her face, poor girl.)

When out and about in Inverness today I spotted a mini skirt which ticks several baroque boxes. Not boxes in the literal sense. If you, or this mini skirt for that matter, were to start drawing big ticks on to opulent ornaments from the 1600s people would have something to say about it!

Next baroque mini skirt, size 14, £4, Shelter Scotland, Inverness

Next baroque mini skirt, size 14, £4, Shelter Scotland, Inverness

You might be thinking that you can’t get any less extravagant than a Next mini skirt, especially taking into account the lack of material and build quality combined. Nevertheless, I have a revelation for you: the word baroque is derived from several European versions of a word meaning  “rough or imperfect pearl”. I don’t know about you but the words ‘rough’ and ‘imperfect’ are much better suited to the Next skirt than the Saint Lauren blouse. I consider that a roaring success.

 

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